How to Communicate with Parents, Students, and Colleagues (The Easy Way!)

How to Communicate with Parents, Students, and Colleagues (The Easy Way!)

Keeping Everyone on the Same Page Doesn’t Have to Be Difficult When You Use this Simple Hack…

Whether your students are in pre-kindergarten, high-school, or somewhere in between, one thing’s for certain– teaching them is not a solo sport. Molding the next generation of young minds takes a lot of effort from a lot of people, and that means teaching requires a lot of communication as well. Unfortunately, organizing classroom communication–from reaching out to PTA-members to communicating with students directly– can be tricky if you don’t know this simple hack.


Don’t waste time sending emails to each recipient individually. Mail merge is a powerful communication tool for teachers that allows you to send personalized mass emails to everyone on your list. Here’s what to do:

  • Download the Gmass Google Chrome extension
  • Gather necessary information in an Excel spreadsheet
  • Design your message

How to Communicate with Parents, Students, and Colleagues (The Easy Way!)

Learning doesn’t stop when your students go home for the day. Mass emails make it easy to stay in touch with parents, students, and colleagues even after the last bell rings.


1. Download the Gmass extension for Google Chrome

Countless people rely on Gmail every day to send personal messages, and now you can use the email platform you already know and love to share important classroom information with parents, students, and colleagues. Download the Gmass browser extension from the Google Chrome store to get started– it just takes a few seconds.


2. Gather the information you need in an Excel sheet

As educators, most of us love our spreadsheets. And why wouldn’t we? They’re a great way to keep all of our important information– from grades to schedules to classroom notes– nice and neat. If you don’t already have an Excel sheet that contains the contact information for the parents, students, or colleagues you need to share information with, now is the perfect time to create one. Or better yet, create one for each group you anticipate emailing!

Your Excel sheet should contain all of the information you need to send an email, plus any additional details you may want to use for personalization purposes. Here are some examples to get you thinking:

  • Recipient name
  • Recipient email
  • Student’s current grade
  • Any notes or important information about student behavior
  • Student-specific classroom assignments
  • Tools and resources that particular student may find helpful

3. Create and send emails

Now that you have your Gmass extension installed and your Excel sheet filled up, it’s time to create a mail merge campaign. It might sound complicated if you’ve never created one before, but designing a mail merge campaign is really pretty simple. Just create a Gmail message as usual, and start designing.

For more detailed information about using your Excel sheet to create a mail merge campaign, look no further than the Gmass blog.

How to Communicate with Parents, Students, and Colleagues (The Easy Way!)

Make sure important information reaches your students and their parents– without giving you a headache. Mass emails make classroom communication easy.


To be a teacher, you have to communicate with parents, students, and colleagues constantly. Don’t waste time sending each email individually– save time and energy by taking advantage of mail merge software today!

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6 Comments

  1. These all are great tips! I know my parents would always check school website pages and such because they were worried about being out of the loop! These emails seem like they are the perfect solution.

    Like

  2. Very useful tips. Sending emails can be very time consuming and feel repetitive, however, it looks like Gmass eliminates the tiresomeness of email sending. I will for sure be trying out Gmass in the near future and by the looks of it, it will be very helpful. Thank you!

    Like

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