You HAVE To Use Virtual Reality As A Writing Prompt.

I recently needed a short, engaging prompt to inspire my students to write.


The lesson focused on ‘show not tell’ when describing feelings –  i.e. instead of telling the reader how they felt “I was scared”, they show how the characters are feeling “my hands began to tremble and a cold pain shot up my spine”.

I thought, why not use virtual reality and see what effect it had?


Is it difficult to use VR in the classroom?

 The answer is no.  All you need is a set of cheap VR headsets (my class has 6), paired with smartphones or iPod touches.  Here’s how to set up:


I found a great 360 clip on YouTube of a rollercoaster ride; what better way to get the students thinking about feeling words!  Just put the phone in the VR headset, load the video and tap on the VR icon:


Watch how amazing VR was at immersing my students in the theme park adventure:


The writing produced was excellent and I am convinced VR increased the quality:

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Finally, here’s a handy graphic, showing you some more ways to use virtual reality in your lessons:

Simple Ways To Use Google Cardboard In The Classroom


Have you used virtual reality to inspire students?  How?  Let me know by commenting below.

4 thoughts on “You HAVE To Use Virtual Reality As A Writing Prompt.

  1. I have been using Google Classroom all year and have managed to cut my photocopying by about 90%. All worksheets are uploaded and accessible offline, this includes assessment tasks (exams are still old fashioned). I have combined it with Google Docs so that students can share their work with me and I can edit and give feedback easily. This has also avoided the old ‘I lost it/ I’m sure I put it in my bag’ excuses.
    There are instructional videos on YouTube and its soooo easy to use.

    Like

  2. Pingback: You HAVE To Use Virtual Reality As A Writing Prompt. – EDTECH 4 BEGINNERS - Artificial Reality

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